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Oduduwa's Chain: Locations of Culture in the Yoruba Atlantic

Presented by Andrew Apter, cultural anthropologist and professor in the Department of History at UCLA. Hosted by the Department of Anthropology.

Oct 23, 2017
from 04:10 PM to 06:00 PM

Andrews Conference Room, 2203 SS&H

Andrew Apter, a former Guggenheim Fellow, is a cultural anthropologist and professor in the Department of History at UCLA, and former director of the African Studies Center there. He is the author of Black Critics and Kings: The Hermeneutics of Power in Yoruba Society (U Chicago Press), Beyond Words: Discourse and Critical Agency in Africa (Chicago), The Pan-African Nation: Oil and the Spectacle of Culture in Nigeria (Chicago), and the forthcoming Oduduwa's Chain: Locations of Culture in the Yoruba Atlantic (Chicago). 
He has also written several influential articles, including "IBB=419: Nigerian Democracy and the Politics of Illusion." 

Abstract
In this talk, I will be presenting the conceptual framing of my forthcoming book, Oduduwa’s Chain: Locations of Culture in the Yoruba-Atlantic, a collection of my “diaspora” essays over the last 25 years. In response to authors who insist on reducing all New World cultural “connections” with West Africa to metadiscursive frameworks and political strategies, I critically reformulate a dynamic culture concept to illuminate West African historical trajectories in the Americas.