News

Symposium Seeks New Stories of Vietnam Past and Present

Symposium Seeks New Stories of Vietnam Past and Present

By Phyllis Jeffrey - How might exploring the Vietnam War through the experience of ordinary Vietnamese individuals complicate existing historical accounts? How can engagement with new sources, histories, and perspectives afford new opportunities to probe Vietnam’s past—and engage with its present, too? Such questions were at the heart of an event entitled "Revisiting Viet Nam War History: Understanding the Army of the Republic of Viet Nam," hosted by the New Viet Nam Studies Cluster on October 19, 2016.

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Tambar Probes Politics of Non-Violence

Tambar Probes Politics of Non-Violence

By Tanzeen R. Doha – What does Turkey’s Peace Mothers movement mean for traditional humanitarian notions of non-violence? Can it ease tension between the Turkish state and the pro-Kurdish PKK? At a colloquium hosted by the Department of Anthropology on October 17, 2016, Kabir Tambar of Stanford University suggested that the Mothers’ declarations of friendship provide a potential pathway to peace.

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Resendez Reframes Slavery in North America

Resendez Reframes Slavery in North America

By Tanzeen R. Doha - Unlike the enslavement of Africans, Native American slavery was historically illegal across much of North America. Yet, as Andrés Reséndez explained on October 12, 2016, at a colloquium held in honor of Indigenous Peoples’ Day, it was practiced for centuries—sometimes by Indians themselves.

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Paik Interrogates Rightlessness at Guantanamo

Paik Interrogates Rightlessness at Guantanamo

By Tanzeen R. Doha - On October 6, 2016, A. Naomi Paik, a professor of Asian American studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, gave a talk entitled “Rightlessness: Hunger Strikes, Force-feeding, and Testimony at Guantanamo.” In it, she sought theoretical and practical solutions to systematic prisoner oppression.

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Hahn Turns American History "Inside Out"

Hahn Turns American History "Inside Out"

By Phyllis Jeffrey - Why do certain historical narratives become entrenched—and with what consequences? On October 10, 2016, in a talk entitled "The United States from the Inside Out and Southside North," Roy F. and Jeannette P. Nichols Professor in American History at New York University Steven Hahn explored the consequences of shifting the vantage point from which we look upon processes of historical change.

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Callender Saves and Kills Time

Callender Saves and Kills Time

By Phyllis Jeffrey – Can the emerging field of quantum gravity "save" the concept of time from Einstein's theory of general relativity? Seeking answers on October 7, 2016 was philosopher of science Craig Callender, in a talk hosted by the Philosophy and Physics of Space-Time cluster, entitled “A Tale of Two Times.”

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Popov Investigates Homeless Programs

Popov Investigates Homeless Programs

By Tanzeen Doha - On September 30, 2016, Igor Popov, an economist trained at Stanford University, kicked off this year’s UC Davis Center for Poverty Research seminar series. Popov’s presentation drew on data related to homelessness, and explored social programs that aim to reduce poverty and social dependency.

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Presner Weighs Ethics of Digital Holocaust Archives

Presner Weighs Ethics of Digital Holocaust Archives

By Phyllis Jeffrey - What ethical issues arise when the Holocaust is digitized—when experience is turned into interface, database, and algorithm? Professor Todd Presner, of the University of California Los Angeles, explored such questions on September 29, 2016, in a lecture entitled “The Ethics of the Algorithm: Probing the Shoah Foundation's Digital Archives of Holocaust and Genocide Testimony.”

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Nussbaum Calls for "Revolutionary" Justice Beyond Anger

Nussbaum Calls for "Revolutionary" Justice Beyond Anger

By Phyllis Jeffrey - Is justice without anger possible? Are global movements for revolutionary justice and equality conceivable without the righteous rage of activists? At the Mondavi Center at UC Davis on September 21, 2016, renowned philosopher Martha Nussbaum questioned our core assumptions about such matters.

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Sociology PhD Student Selected for Prestigious Health Leadership Program

Sociology PhD Student Selected for Prestigious Health Leadership Program

A UC Davis graduate student has been selected to join Health Policy Research Scholars, a new program led by Johns Hopkins University with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Roy Taggueg, a PhD student in the Department of Sociology, will collaborate with scholars from across the United States, advancing a culture of health and well-being for all.

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"9/11 Generation" Lives Life Under Surveillance

"9/11 Generation" Lives Life Under Surveillance

By Jeffrey Day - Young people of South Asian, Afghan and Arab descent growing up in a post-9/11 world feel constantly under suspicion and surveillance. Their lives are the focus of the book THE 9/11 GENERATION: YOUTH, RIGHTS, AND SOLIDARITY IN THE WAR ON TERROR (New York University Press) by Sunaina Marr Maira, a professor in the UC Davis Department of Asian American Studies.

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Study Helps National Park Service Commemorate Reconstruction Era

Study Helps National Park Service Commemorate Reconstruction Era

By Karen Nikos-Rose - As the National Park Service celebrates its 100th anniversary this summer, a University of California, Davis, professor has focused on an oft-forgotten part of U.S. history that our national parks are now helping the public to understand — the Reconstruction era.

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Ney Awarded NSF Grant for 'Wave Function Realism' Project

Ney Awarded NSF Grant for 'Wave Function Realism' Project

By Ben Hinshaw - Alyssa Ney, an associate professor of philosophy at UC Davis, has received a grant from the National Science Foundation to carry out a philosophical interpretation of the wave function in quantum theories.

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Paper Brings Network Science to Capone's Chicago

Paper Brings Network Science to Capone's Chicago

By Ben Hinshaw - In a new co-authored paper, Chris Smith, assistant professor of sociology and 2016-17 ISS fellow, brings network science to gangster-era Chicago. Combining the concept of multiplexity with deep archival research, the paper explores the overlapping of criminal, personal and legitimate networks in Al Capone's infamous world of gambling, prostitution, and bootleg booze.

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Tech For Social Good Projects Awarded at UC Davis

Tech For Social Good Projects Awarded at UC Davis

Five teams have been awarded the inaugural Tech for Social Good seed grants at UC Davis. The winning proposals support development of UV-based water purification systems in refugee resettlements, youth entrepreneurship in South Sudan, women’s access to breastfeeding education, climate change awareness, and a quadriplegia-friendly tricycle for people with physical limitations.

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Spring Colloquium Series Probes Human-Nature Interactions

Spring Colloquium Series Probes Human-Nature Interactions

By Nickolas Perrone – The Environments and Societies Spring 2016 Colloquium Series brought scholars from around the country to UC Davis to discuss the latest research on human-nature interactions. A wide array of topics included the Anthropocene in Victorian literature, Native American migration and adaptation to colonialism, capitalism and commodities, food systems in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, environmental justice and gentrification in San Francisco, and underwater art in an era of rising sea levels.

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Study Debunks Gender Performance Gap in Online Video Games

Study Debunks Gender Performance Gap in Online Video Games

By Kathleen Holder - In the realm of fantasy video games, one epic monster stalks players both online and in the real world—the stereotype that men make better players than women. A new study led by a researcher at the University of California, Davis, slays that troll.

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ASPIRE Symposium Showcases Undergraduate Research

ASPIRE Symposium Showcases Undergraduate Research

By Emily Kappenman - The ISS ASPIRE Undergraduate Research Program held its second annual Spring Research Symposium on June 3, 2016 at the Center for Mind & Brain. The event featured poster presentations by each of the eleven ASPIRE Scholars, detailing the research they completed during the 2015-2016 academic year.

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Novak Distributes Insight into Cassette Culture

Novak Distributes Insight into Cassette Culture

By Phyllis Jeffrey - Amid debates over digital freedom and open access, the person-to-person networks of contemporary cassette circulation raise interesting questions about democracy and exclusivity. On May 26, 2016, David Novak, an associate professor of music at UC Santa Barbara, addressed the history and contemporary resurgence of cassette culture.

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Stoeffler Rates Insurance Among West African Farmers

Stoeffler Rates Insurance Among West African Farmers

By Rebecca Egli – Facing high levels of risk, farmers in developing countries need good insurance. At a lecture hosted on May 26, 2016 by the Africa-California Research Innovations Cluster, Quentin Stoeffler, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at UC Davis, presented his research on the quality of index insurance available to cotton farmers in Burkina Faso.

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Conference Envisions New Methods in Political Scholarship

Conference Envisions New Methods in Political Scholarship

By Phyllis Jeffrey - On May 17 and 18, 2016 the UC Davis Department of Political Science, in collaboration with its counterpart at UC Merced, hosted the ninth annual Visions in Methodology conference. The event brought together researchers from across the nation with the goal of supporting women who study political methodology.

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Lippman Sounds Call for "Resonant Ethnography"

Lippman Sounds Call for "Resonant Ethnography"

By Rebecca Egli – Can anthropologists listen? How important is sound for ethnographic research? On May 19, 2016 Alexandra Lippman, a cultural anthropologist and postdoctoral fellow with the Innovating Communication in Scholarship project, raised such questions when she presented her chapter from a forthcoming book that examines alternative ways researchers record and share knowledge about society.

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Rauchway Investigates Politics of Inflation [Video]

Rauchway Investigates Politics of Inflation [Video]

What can the Great Depression and its aftermath teach us about “current unpleasantness” in the U.S. economy? On May 11, 2016, Professor of History Eric Rauchway offered some clues through a discussion of his latest book “The Money Makers.” Moderated by Professor of Economics Christopher M. Meissner, the event represented a combining of two series: ISS Noon Lectures and DHI Brown Bag Book Chats.

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Pellow Calls for Critical Environmental Justice

Pellow Calls for Critical Environmental Justice

By Phyllis Jeffrey - On May 12, 2016, David Pellow of UC Santa Barbara delivered the Department of Sociology’s annual Lemert Lecture. Entitled "Critical Environmental Justice Studies: An Invitation and Challenge for the 21st Century," Pellow's talk explored (among other things) environmental privilege and disadvantage in Aspen and Silicon Valley.

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Symposium Honors Global Indigenous Movements

Symposium Honors Global Indigenous Movements

By Rebecca Egli - On May 5 and 6, 2016 the Native American Studies program at UC Davis held its fifth annual graduate student symposium. Scholars presented new research on topics including female empowerment in urban Peru, hip-hop from the Mapuche, the revival of Indigenous tattoos, and the role of storytelling in cultural resilience.

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McCarty Reveals Political Effects of Income Inequality

McCarty Reveals Political Effects of Income Inequality

By Phyllis Jeffrey - Does widening income inequality cause greater political polarization? Does it affect the Democratic and Republican parties in the same ways? On May 6, 2016 Nolan McCarty, Susan Dod Brown Professor of Politics and Public Affairs and chair of the Department of Politics at Princeton University, explored these issues in a talk entitled "Unequal Incomes, Ideology and Gridlock: How Rising Inequality Increases Political Polarization."

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ISS Conference Confronts Transparency and Replication "Crisis"

ISS Conference Confronts Transparency and Replication "Crisis"

By Ben Hinshaw - As the debate regarding the so-called replication crisis in social science continues, the Making Social Science Transparent conference (hosted by ISS on April 22, 2016) provided a timely opportunity to tackle the issue head-on. Scholars from an array of institutions and fields convened to assess the extent of the problem, and to develop paths towards lasting solutions.

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Devji Probes Intellectual Views on Partition

Devji Probes Intellectual Views on Partition

By Rebecca Egli - On April 19, 2016 Dr. Faisal Devji of the University of Oxford spoke about the relations between Hindus and Muslims within the context of twentieth century British colonialism in India. His presentation, "Fatal Attraction: Interest, Intimacy, and Violence in Indian Political Thought," examined the work of several prominent figures writing around the time of the partition that led, in 1947, to the creation of the nation of Pakistan as a separate sovereign nation from India.

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Ginzburg's Lunn Lecture Reads Against the Grain

Ginzburg's Lunn Lecture Reads Against the Grain

By Rebecca Egli - "Carlo Ginzburg is the best historian of his generation." So declared Mario Biagioli, UC Davis professor of science and technology studies, as he introduced the 24th Annual Eugene Lunn Memorial Lecture on April 18, 2016. Ginzburg, professor emeritus of intellectual and cultural history at UCLA, gave a talk entitled "Unintentional Revelations: Reading History Against the Grain."

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Symposium Investigates Complex Role of Borders

Symposium Investigates Complex Role of Borders

By Phyllis Jeffrey - Do borders simply keep outsiders out? Or do they reflect the tensions and insecurities that characterize citizenship and the nation-state system in the 21st century? On April 15, 2016 the Mellon Initiative in Comparative Border Studies tackled such questions at its Spring Symposium, entitled “Borders: What’s Up With That? Displacements, Belongings, Rights.”

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